Two Inadequate Voices




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2IV is a platform for image-makers to recount and reflect textually on their stories of being out in the world whilst photographing.

twoinadequatevoices@gmail.com



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Two Inadequate Voices



“But here, on a cold winter’s afternoon, on the shore of a hypertrophic lake, I feel I’ve entered a cemetery. Many of the trees are dead or dying - beaten and battered - some doubled over from halfway up (the effects of a tremendous wind?) I can’t help but think of a Tibetan charnel ground - an open-air cemetery, where, owing to the frozen ground, the dismembered body parts of the dead are left to lie out in the open - left to be devoured by wild animals or to rot gruesomely into oblivion.”


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September 2021




“So perhaps the most complex and entangled of all human processing and response is the data generated by human love. As a species, we are born of water and sunlight, have made our home in a hyper- physicality, and are squarely lining ourselves up, like Thelma and Louise, onto the infinite possibilities of pure data. In many ways, a love fueled consciousness feels like our divine achievement, extending us beyond our bodies and the limitations of gravity.”


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August 2021





“Through Marianna I discovered a new way to look at this familiar world of the family farm. She helped me to understand the present from the past and get closer to the people and place where I grew up, with a deeper knowledge of how life used to be and both the traumas and privilege that made my family who they are today.”


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August 2021


“My work functions at the edges of the documentary practice: especially in the case of military issues, it will never be possible to visualise the picture in its entirety, so I am able – required, almost – to fill in the blanks with as much integrity as possible in terms of connecting very specific scenes in front of me with my broader philosophy about the corrosive cultural effects of being in a state of permanent war.”


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July 2021




“We often went there for the friendliness, the great sushi and the ‘play’ between the family members. Being the gajin in Onishi, the son was allowed to train his skills on our orders but the father was always there watching from the doorframe as his son worked. Unknown to us was whether he was proud of the accomplishments of his son or still not satisfied.”


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July 2021



“I suspect this is a very common occurrence for a lot of artists. Initially drawn by concern, critique or sadness, the process of making something that hits those emotional notes can be satisfying and exciting, but it’s also kind of, well, gross. I don’t like feeling excited to have the chance to photograph something awful, yet I can’t lie and pretend I don’t feel a thrill here and there. I wonder, perhaps, if I’m now too distant from the issue.”


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June 2021



“As with my first visit, I was alone only partly - the occasional fisher or hiker would pass by and, this time, a small group of school aged children and their guide quizzically studying my engagement with a small branch of the yew extending over the footpath. A single sheet of fiber-based silver gelatin paper was clipped to the underside of the branch with a gaffer clothespin, its light sensitive side facing toward the sky.”


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June 2021



“As much as the real drawbacks of the car are plain to see, I appreciated Burt’s simple explanation of what the car meant to him personally. Even while I hope the reign of the car will come to an end, I’m reminded of the complexities of this long relationship. The car is both a source of alienation and connection. It can give us freedom to go anywhere but also force us into gridlock.”


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“The story of meeting Yoshito is part of a larger picture of my life and Butoh is perhaps one of the catalysts for me to travel to Japan just after the big earthquake of 2011. That trip ended up changing many aspects of my life but before going, I knew all along I wanted to pay a visit to Mr. Ohno and listen in first-hand about his father and what Butoh represented to the people who started this art/dance movement in the beginning of the 60s.”


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April 2021




“The landscape of the Mallee seems to operate in this constant binary – new and mutable but ancient and fixed, with its shorelines fluctuating back and forth with the seasons for thousands of years. Dotted around the circumference of the Pink Lakes are the remnants of a salt mining industry, once a briefly thriving community that is now a collection of rusted remains and broken jetties that rot in the muddy salt.”


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April 2021



 

“We kept the construction design simple and documented our observations and interactions within the temporal and spatial phenomenon of the installation inside the room over the period of a week. Within the room we witnessed human and nonhuman daily activities and the change of light during the day as it moved across the inner surfaces of the room.”


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“Just before he died, he told her that he wanted his ashes to be immersed in the holiest of rivers. It was such a long way from Warrnambool. She either forgot or didn’t know how to help fulfil his dying wish, even though she had provided him great comfort in his last days. His ashes remained uncollected in the parlour for 63 years. Only in 2010 did his remains finally touch the hands of his descendants and then, shortly after, the cloudy waters of the Ganges.”


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Mar 2021




“Charlie continues this monologue, telling me how this world doesn’t work anymore, how the towns have changed, how he never sees his grown children who live nearby. He never makes eye contact, but rather, stares through me or over me or beyond me. Maybe there are tears welling in the corner of those steely eyes.”


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Feb 2021




Valley of Hell and Kingdom of Heaven

“My personal situation as an immigrant to the UK, made me feel a certain estrangement from my once familiar surroundings. Staying abroad enabled me to see things I had not previously been aware of. Every time when I returned to my home country I felt the urge to document this region, inspired by my feelings of distance and displacement.”


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A Brief History

“So, my practice involved placing myself into his being as much as possible in order to feel close to him (both as his niece and as an artist). This allows me to engage in a conversation with my uncle through photography, as well as to negotiate and share in my family’s experiences of trauma, particularly those that involved being separated by the division of North and South during the time of the war.”


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Quynh Lam


Jan 2021



All Quiet on the Home Front

“And that’s how we ended up in Bath, in a two-bedroom regency flat on Grosvenor Place for £450 a month. It had amazing views, a mouse problem, and ½ inch plumbing pipework that needed a macerator to get the waste down the toilet. Flush the toilet and you could hear the cogs grinding. I’ll never forget the sound of cogs grinding through shit.”


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Hello, The Twenthieth Century


“The work could be described as a search for expression without or beyond ego.  Others say this is an alternative history by unsung and unknown people: portraits of people without their faces or figures. If you define literature as a depiction of human beings profoundly and specifically with words, then those texts are short novels or poems.”


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Interview:
Fumimasa Hosokawa

Dec 2020




PIK-NIK


“I gathered that two men had followed a lady into the far reaches of the beach at low tide and had apparently harassed her. The motley crowd could somewhat see from afar what was happening out on the sea-bed. They waited patiently for the men to return and had meted out some form of mob justice upon their return.”


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Arko Datto 

Dec 2020





A Fisherman’s Story


“I soon realised that the gentleman was approaching me slowly while exhaling smoke from his cigarette. He was small and in his late 70s (I guess) and wore a cap, sunglasses and rubber boots. He didn’t wear a mask and I quickly put my mask on. He pointed to the ditch right next to the small sand pile where he knelt down.”


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Anywhere but Here


“Free from responsibility and no longer having to answer to anyone, I’m able to explore my own psyche and express my state of mind while pointing my camera outward, towards other people, animals or landscapes… basically at everything that draws my attention or speaks to me.“


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Mounds Park


“The more I visit Mounds Park, the more aware I am of the limitations of vision. As a place that has long aided various kinds of orientation, Mounds Park emphasizes what is beyond the scope of our perceptions, instead of only providing an acute understanding of the surrounding landscape. While it is grounding to literally know where you stand, I always find myself drifting towards thoughts of what is still elusive despite seeing clear visual information.“


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Ethan Jones

Nov 2020






Sheltered Under the Arms of my Ancestor


“This trip home was the first time that I had seen my mountain, or my river, or stood on my marae. As an adoptee and as a member of the Māori diaspora in Australia, connecting to my whakapapa (ancestral line), continues to be a disrupted, complicated and emotional voyage where information is necessarily gleaned from a range of sources.“ 


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Kirsten Lyttle

Nov 2020







Do Brumbies Dream in Red? 


“I came to learn this brumby was an aged mare who would have been fleeing from the fire and had died from a lung bleed. The horse was the manifestation of our history, our present and future, tied to our existence and an extension of our actions.“


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Tom Goldner

Nov 2020






Samurai Blue


“Arriving in Shibuya, I was absolutely shocked. You would have thought Japan had just won the World Cup, defeating Brazil 10 - 0 by the level of euphoria on the streets. It was absolute pandemonium.”


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Sean Lotman

Oct 2020






The East Was Red


“Every generation seem to have a major event that defined the memories of their youth and coming of age. For Americans my age, that event was 9-11. For young people in our current time, it no doubt will be our current pandemic. For Chinese people of my parents’ generation, that event was the Cultural Revolution.”


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Sheila Zhao

Oct 2020






Notes from Wonderland


“The workers were never given information about how to handle mercury. Nor were they given any kind of protective gear. They were also never told how to clean themselves before leaving the factory. Mercury would stick to them in the ridges of their palms and even on the tips of their moustache. They would subsequently carry the mercury back home unknowingly.“

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Rohit Saha

Sep 2020






The Reflection in the Pool


“Merely imagining myself in another’s shoes, it turns out, can be a distinctly solipsistic, limited, objectifying form of empathy. No one responds like anyone else. I learned about each of these men by allowing them to show me and teach me, by having relationships and accepting difference.“

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Shane Rochelau

Sep 2020






Photography as a Means of Preservation


“I love being there with him. It’s a part of me. This place forms the foundation of my personal history that began before I took my first breaths, back when my father was a boy and when his parents were desperately and tenaciously sweating their way out of a pre-industrial poverty.“

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Ying Ang

Sep 2020






Suburban Melancholy with a Hint of Tinsel


“I started thinking about the lead up to my Christmases as a kid. Exceedingly hot, still days, plastic wreaths hanging from the trees fruitlessly adorning roundabouts and the old lady, Marge, wearing a Santa Claus hat busking at the end of the Star Court Arcade. We’d make mad dashes for last minute presents and stock up with supplies before the world stopped and everything shuts down until after the new year.“

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Zilverbeek


“The second time I went there I decided to record myself taking some sludge out of the creek with a video. The more I began to dig inside this work, the more I became conscious of the performative aspect this project began to take on. I took approximately one litre of sludge in a square plastic tupperware. I wanted to have it analysed in order to know if some silver particles were still present in it, even though I knew it was probably impossible.“

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Lucas Leffler

Sep 2020






Baltimore, MD


“We exchanged a couple blows each then he stepped back and ran off. I started chasing after him from the adrenaline then came to my senses and stopped. I did get a shot of him going down the block but that isn’t the point of the story. I realized I should hea back as I had a cut on my face and my hands, in addition to a huge tear in my tshirt.”

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Jesse Freeman

Sep 2020






Zaido


“I followed my father’s instructions and boarded a train called The Galaxy Express with camera and no idea where I was heading but I knew why. When I got off the train at a small village in Akita prefecture it was covered in silvery white snow. Mist had settled, making it seem like an otherworldly dream place.“

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Yukari Chikura


Aug 2020





Huon


“The tree had been left by the convict cutters of the early 1880s as it was too old, too misshapen and it was too large to be moved had it been felled. It was said that three men all over six foot were unable to link arms around the tree. It was significant enough to acquire a nickname, the Lea Tree, and had become a symbol for the conservationists that were trying to protect the area.“

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Noah Thompson

Aug 2020






On The Early Days in Shinjuku


“As I get older, I probably won't be able to make many prints and also my memories will slowly vanish. That's why I made it. Memories of Younger Days in Shinjuku was edited and published by myself. There is no explanation or extensive text, I want the reader to look for hints in the pictures and use their imagination.”

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Interview: 
Koji Onaka

Aug 2020







Serial Stalker


“I began my super weird solo American road trip to all her old haunts, lugging my homemade 8x10 camera constructed from light-weight aluminium and garden plastic (with its epic Schneider lens which now languishes on a shelf in my studio) and black hood, trying to think of what to say to onlookers and enquirers about what the fuck* I was doing.”

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Ann Shelton

Aug 2020






The Pines


“What I did begin to realise was that Alan epitomised the themes that had begun to flow through the images I was taking. The work was about escapism and being stuck in a suburb fuelled by socio-economic struggle. Alan was a courseless ship set on a route confined to the boundaries of the suburb, stuck in its centripetal pull.“

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James Bugg

Aug 2020